Installing our Rain Garden

Youth Rain Action Storyboard

Post 19: Installing our Rain Garden!

It’s finally time to install our rain garden! The day started off pretty rainy, but maybe that is fitting, seeing how we are building a rain garden. We had a pretty good turnout with about 12 volunteers coming out.

Installation was hard work! The first thing we did was lay rocks along the sidewalk. Under the rocks we put geotextile fabric so that weeds will not grow through the rocks. Not only do weeds in the rocks look bad, but it also prevents water movement.

ditch-along-sidewalk-filled-with-rock

Ditch along sidewalk filled with rocks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laying rock at the entrance of the rain garden.

Laying rocks at the entrance of the rain garden.

Part way through the morning we took a break for a very special guest – MPP Damerla! She represents the Mississauga East – Cooksville Riding, which was also where we are building our rain garden. She talked to us about how important environmental projects are and how she admired our hard work. She even helped us move some soil into the garden.

MPP Damerla talking to the youth about their rain garden.

MPP Damerla talking to the youth about their rain garden.

Next we had to fill the main part of the garden. We continued the rock spillway through the garden and out to the other end. If there is too much water, it will flow out the outlet. Then we replaced some of the clay soil with rain garden soil. Now, this is no ordinary soil. Water drainage is really important in a rain garden, so we made sure to use a soil that was mostly sand mixed with a bit of compost. Gro Bark makes a soil that is premixed to the TRCA and CVC rain garden guidelines.

Finally, it was time to start planting! We used the diagram to mark out where each plant was going to go. Then we took turns planting everything. Some of the plants were still in bloom, and looked amazing!

Volunteers planting the rain garden and laying mulch.

Volunteers planting the rain garden and laying mulch.

The last step was mulch. We used a shredded pine bark mulch for our garden. Adding a layer of mulch makes the garden prettier, acts as a barrier against weeds, and acts as a mat to help hold in water. After nine hours of working, our garden was complete! We are so happy with how it turned out.

Volunteer posing with the completed rain garden.

Volunteer posing with the completed rain garden.

 


Visit the Youth Rain Action project page to learn more or contact Emily Dutton at edutton@ecosource.ca.

The Youth Rain Action Project is led by Ecosource in partnership with Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, the Burnhamthorpe Sustainable Neighbourhood Retrofit Action Plan (SNAP), and Sheridan Nurseries, and is generously supported by the Government of Ontario’s Great Lakes Guardian Community Fund.